Black History: Charlayne Hunter-Gault

Charlayne Hunter-Gault was the first African American woman to enroll in the University of Georgia; she was also among the first African American women to graduate from the university, earning a degree in journalism in 1963. And in 1978, she became the first Black woman to anchor a national newscast, “The MacNeil/Lehrer Report”.

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Black History: Clara Leach Adams-Ender

Clara Leach Adams-Ender was the 1st black woman and nurse to receive a master’s degree from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. She was also the 1st woman to be awarded the Expert Field Medical Badge, the 1st black Army Nurse Corps officer to graduate from the Army War College, the 1st black nurse appointed chief of nursing …

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Black History: Rebecca Lee Crumpler

Rebecca Lee Crumpler challenged the prejudice that prevented African Americans from pursuing careers in medicine to became the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree, a distinction formerly credited to Rebecca Cole. Although little has survived to tell the story of Crumpler’s life, she has secured her place in the historical record with her …

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Black History: Rudolph Fisher

Rudolph Fisher was a physician, orator, music arranger, and writer during the Harlem Renaissance. His first short story, “City of Refuge,” which depicted the clashes between the newly arrived southern African Americans and Harlem’s black society, was published by the Atlantic Monthly in 1925. His second novel, The Conjure Man Dies, published in 1932, is still considered to be the …

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Black History: Edward R Bradley

Edward R Bradley became the first black co-editor of “Sixty Minutes”, a weekly news magazine on CBS-TV. His previous assignments included principal correspondent for “CBS Report,” CBS News White House correspondent, anchor of the “CBS Sunday Night News,” and reports broadcaster on “CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite.” He is a native of Pennsylvania and a graduate of Cheyney State …

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Black History: Nathan Francis Mossell

Nathan Francis Mossell (1856-1946) was the first African American to graduate from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He established the Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital and Training School, which was the first African American hospital in Philadelphia. In addition to being the first African American member of the Philadelphia County Medical Society, Mossell was the co-founder of the Philadelphia …

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